Unbelievable….These 23 Mind Blowing Facts Will DESTROY Your Understanding of Time
May31

Unbelievable….These 23 Mind Blowing Facts Will DESTROY Your Understanding of Time

1. Cleopatra lived closer to the building of Pizza Hut than the pyramids. The Great Pyramid was built cerca 2560 BC, while Cleopatra lived around 30 BC. The first Pizza Hut opened in 1958, which is about 500 years closer. 2. Every two minutes, we take as many photos as all of humanity took during the 1800s. On the left is the first photograph ever taken (1826), View from the Window at Le Gras by French inventor Joseph Nicéphore Niépce. On the right is a cat who accidentally took a picture of itself (2013). It’s estimated that in 2014, humans will take 880 billion photos (not including cats). In fact, 10% of all the photos ever taken were taken in the past 12 months. blog.1000memories 3. Oxford University is older than the Aztecs. wallpapers87 Teaching started in Oxford as early as 1096, and by 1249, the University was officially founded. The Aztec civilization as we know it began with the founding of Tenochtitlán in 1325. smithsonianmag 4. Will Smith is now older than Uncle Phil was at the beginning of “The Fresh Prince.” When James Avery (Uncle Phil) started on The Fresh Prince, he was 45-years-old. Today, Will Smith is a slightly older 45. 5. In the span of 66 years, we went from taking flight to landing on the moon. museumvictoria In 1903 the Wright brothers successfully flew a plane for a whopping 59 seconds. 38 years later, in 1941, the Japanese used flight to bomb Pearl Harbor. Only 28 years after that, Apollo 11 landed on the moon in 1969. 6. There is more processing power in a TI-83 calculator than in the computer that landed Apollo 11 on the moon. audacity The guidance computer from the Apollo 11 mission ran at 1.024 MHz, about 1/6th of the processing power of a TI-83 calculator. One is used by students to play Tetris, the other took humans to the moon. quora 7. The oldest living person’s birth is closer to the signing of the Constitution than present day. zimbio Misao Okawa was born in 1898, an astonishing 116 years ago. The Constitution was signed in 1787, which makes her life 4 years closer to the historic Philadelphia convention than to today. youtube 8. John Tyler, America’s 10th President, has two living grandchildren. John Tyler served from 1841 to 1845, a full 20 years before Abraham Lincoln. He had a son, Lyon, at age 63. Lyon would have Lyon Jr. and Harrison at 71 and 75, respectively. Both are still alive today and in their 80’s. 9. The first pyramids were built while the woolly mammoth was still alive....

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Quote of the day: “The best way to find yourself is to lose yourself in the service of others.” -Ghandi
May31

Quote of the day: “The best way to find yourself is to lose yourself in the service of others.” -Ghandi

Pic Source: http://www.psychologynoteshq.com/helping-others/

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Transforming The Mind: De-Programming Mental Conditioning
May27

Transforming The Mind: De-Programming Mental Conditioning

There are times in our day-to-day life when we experience ourselves acting or thinking in ways we wish could be different. Sometimes, it can seem like our thoughts are running on auto-pilot, and whoever is doing the driving is not the most qualified person for the job. These thoughts then lead to actions which we regret later. The reason for this is that we often have un-conscious mental and emotional programs running our lives. Maybe these programs are fine for going about our daily interactions with the world, but what happens when they are no longer helping us to live our lives to the fullest? THE FIRST STEP: UNCOVERING THAT WHICH IS HIDDEN Since they are subconscious, these programs do a good job of staying hidden. Consciousness is not something which can be seen or touched, so it can be difficult to pinpoint disharmonious patterns within it. What are the signs that a subconscious mental program is affecting us? Fortunately, these programs leave traces that they are indeed there. These traces come in the form of negative thoughts, or that nagging little voice in the head. Knowing this, we can follow the breadcrumbs of thought to the root of what is running them. Thoughts can be likened to bubbles in a lake. We can observe the bubbles on the surface, but where they come from is deep down at the bottom. Likewise, thoughts appear at the surface of our mind, but where they come from is deep down, in the realm of emotions. Thoughts are the surface signs of emotions. We can begin by examining the inner voice we hear in our head, as well as the outer voice coming out of our mouths, and just observe them. It can quickly be seen that thoughts occur all on their own, spontaneously, like a radio station continually broadcasting into space. If we tune into the mental stream, they become the central focal point; however, try shifting the dial of focus to the space in which these thoughts are occurring. As you do this, you will discover that the thoughts become blended into the background of awareness. Now, from this space outside of thought, try observing the content of the mind, just don’t get pulled into it. What do you hear? What is the common theme around which the mental chatter is arranged? Is the voice angry? afraid? guilty? Take this chance to be radically honest with yourself – this is not a time to be squeamish! STEP TWO: REMOVING IDENTIFICATION WITH THE MIND Understand that these thoughts are not even yours, so you do not need to identify with them....

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Quote of the day: “Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful,committed people can change the world. Indeed,it is the only thing that ever has.”
May27

Quote of the day: “Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful,committed people can change the world. Indeed,it is the only thing that ever has.”

MARGARET MEAD (1901-1978) An Anthropology of Human Freedom When Margaret Mead died in 1978, she was the most famous anthropologist in the world. Indeed, it was through her work that many people learned about anthropology and its holistic vision of the human species. Mead was born in Philadelphia on December 16, 1901 in a household of social scientists with roots in the Midwest. Her major at Barnard was psychology, but she went on to earn a doctorate at Columbia, studying with Franz Boas and Ruth Benedict. For her, anthropology was an urgent calling, a way to bring new understandings of human behavior to bear on the future. In 1925 she set out for American Samoa, where she did her first field work, focusing on adolescent girls, and in 1929 she went, accompanied by her second husband, Reo Fortune, to Manus Island in New Guinea, where she studied the play and imaginations of younger children and the way they were shaped by adult society. With a Samoan woman, 1925-6. (Mead Archives, Library of Congress.) The Samoan work, published as Coming of Age in Samoa, became a best seller and has been translated into many languages. This work presented to the public for the first time the idea that the individual experience of developmental stages could be shaped by cultural demands and expectations, so that adolescence might be more or less stormy and sexual development more or less problematic in different cultures. It was addressed above all to educators, affirming that the “civilized” world had something to learn from the “primitive.” The Manus work, published as Growing Up in New Guinea, effectively refuted the notion that “primitive” peoples are “like children.” Different developmental stages, and the relationships between them, need to be studied in every culture. Mead was thus the first anthropologist to look at human development in a cross-cultural perspective. In subsequent field work, on mainland New Guinea, she demonstrated that gender roles differed from one society to another, depending at least as much on culture as on biology, and in her work in Bali with her third husband, Gregory Bateson, she explored new ways of documenting the connection between childrearing and adult culture, and the way in which these are symbolically interwoven. She and Gregory Bateson had one child, Mary Catherine Bateson. Mead and husband Gregory Bateson doing field research in Papua, New Guinea, in 1938. (Mead Archives, Library of Congress.) As an anthropologist, Mead had been trained to think in terms of the interconnection of all aspects of human life. The production of food cannot be separated from ritual and belief, and politics cannot be separated from childrearing...

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Man Who Saved 669 Kids From Nazis Turns 105, Gets Beautiful Birthday Honor
May27

Man Who Saved 669 Kids From Nazis Turns 105, Gets Beautiful Birthday Honor

The story of Sir Nicholas Winton is one of the most profound tales of humanitarianism that you’ve probably never heard. After saving 669 children, most of them Jewish, from likely death at Nazi concentration camps at the onset of World War II, it was announced Monday — on Winton’s 105th birthday — that the heroic Englishman will be awarded the Order of the White Lion, the highest order in the Czech Republic, the Associated Press reported. In the official announcement, Czech President Milos Zeman noted Winton’s example of humanity, selflessness, personal bravery and modesty as reasons for the prestigious honor. The award will be given to Winton this October. In December 1938, Winton gave up a vacation as a London-based stockbroker to travel to politically turbulent Prague, according to the Guardian. He was curious to see firsthand what was happening to refugees in what was then Czechoslovakia. Nazis had recently invaded the country, and Winton sensed the grave danger refugees there were facing. He wasn’t an elected official, a high-ranking member of the British military or even someone with a significant background in charitable work. But starting during his three weeks in Prague, Winton made one of the most impactful, single-handed efforts to save children from mass genocide. He created advertisements for foster homes. He manipulated paperwork to sidestep government red tape that would have gotten in his way, CBS News reported. He even persuaded Germans to go along with his plan. Continuing his efforts from his home in London for the next nine months, Winton coordinated eight train evacuations of 669 children from Czechoslovakia to Britain, saving them from almost certain death. For decades, Winton’s heroic efforts largely went unnoticed — until 1988, when a BBC program surprised him by planning an emotional reunion with several of the survivors he saved, the Telegraph reported. So with all things considered, turning 105 years old on May 19 might have been the least of Winton’s achievements. The hero celebrated his landmark birthday with about 100 guests in attendance, many of whom are offspring of the children who Winton rescued in 1939. According to the Guardian, there are roughly 6,000 people around the world today that owe Winton their lives. If you ask him, though, the formula to do good is a pretty simple one. “I work on the motto that if something’s not impossible, there must be a way of doing it,” Winton told CBS News last month. Source: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/05/21/sir-nicholas-winton_n_5365539.html?utm_hp_ref=mostpopular Video Source:...

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