Mini Bio-Intensive Farms Providing Organic Food in the Middle of a Seven Year Drought
Sep07

Mini Bio-Intensive Farms Providing Organic Food in the Middle of a Seven Year Drought

Big Ag models of farming thousands of acres of mono-crops, planted with copious herbicides and petroleum-based fertilizers have depleted our soil, and made arable, non-toxic land hard to come by, but low-cost and low-tech mini-farms sprinkled across America’s landscape are providing sustainable, organic food to millions as we continue into the future. Their model? Farms in Africa and Latin America (among over 150 countries) that are growing food under the harshest conditions imaginable. Companies like Monsanto have a repulsive habit of pushing their patented seeds, infused with infertility or harmful genetic material, onto communities in crisis. Terminator seeds have become famous in India, and linked to thousands of farmer suicides, while Monsanto’s cross-pollination (like it or not) of crops in Hungary and Haiti have also devastated entire communities. Bio-Intensive Farms Can Beat Industrial Farms Any Day! In Mexico, farmers and activists recently won a huge battle against Monsanto, who was trying to cultivate GM corn in an area known for growing more than 36 varieties of indigenous corn that took thousands of years to develop. Mexico’s Supreme Court blocked a move that would allow the cultivation of GMO soy in the Mexican states of Campeche and Yucatan, and in a separate appeals court decision, a federal judge upheld a 2013 ruling that barred companies such as Monsanto and DuPont/Pioneer from planting or selling GM corn within Mexico’s borders. Likewise, a very patronizing attitude toward African farmers has been carried by Big Ag and Biotech companies desirous of insinuating their GM seed into the continent, too, but ‘terminator’ seeds are not wanted there. Monsanto has been out to monopolize the African continent with their seed, but there is a better way, and small-scale farmers are proving it so. It is clear that GM seed has devastated entire countries, let alone communities, but are there other alternatives to providing food for the 7.4 billion people on this planet? The answer is, simply – YES. Farmers like Olawumi Benedict are happily tending to her “little babies” – kale seeds growing in wooden flats just prior to being transplanted, and Jonnes Mlegwah is double-digging a plot of soil meant for potatoes. These farmers are from Africa now working in America, but are representative of a few thousand small-farm workers that have turned to bio-intensive practices from San Francisco to Maine in the US, as a means to generate income, and feed the hungry masses. Small-scale, bio-intensive farming is already happening throughout Latin American and African countries because it works. Its cheap, and effective, and doesn’t require any reliance on biotech’s patented seeds and cancer-causing chemicals. It has been gaining popularity in the States...

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