As UK eateries close, top chef switches to food boxes for needy
Apr06

As UK eateries close, top chef switches to food boxes for needy

LONDON (Reuters) – Londoners have been struggling to get their food shopping done as panic buying triggered by the coronavirus crisis has emptied supermarket shelves, but some will soon be receiving food boxes prepared by a Michelin star-winning chef instead. Andrew Wong, Michelin starred chef at A. Wong, prepares food at his restaurant for the elderly and needy, as as the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) continues, in London, Britain, March 24, 2020. REUTERS/Dylan Martinez Andrew Wong, who serves up sophisticated interpretations of classic Chinese dishes at his restaurant in London’s Pimlico district, has had to abruptly close down along with the rest of the capital’s restaurateurs due to a government-mandated lockdown. “All our business plans have gone out the window anyway,” Wong told Reuters on Tuesday in the deserted premises of A.Wong, which boasts one star in the Michelin Guide, the bible of fine dining. “Whatever we can do in the immediate future – if we can help one person and make them temporarily happy, give them one meal, then that’s enough for the moment,” he said, cutting vegetables, preparing noodles and pouring sauce into takeaway containers. He and his staff have started producing cook-at-home boxes which they plan to give free of charge to vulnerable people who are struggling as radical measures to curb the spread of coronavirus take effect. The team plan to produce 50 to 100 of the boxes per day, dependent on available supplies. Distribution is a challenge, and they are in the process of working with local charities to make sure the boxes go to the people who need them most. “We’re working together with our local church, which has many links with local charities, who have also got volunteers who are going to distribute it to people in isolation, but also to food banks, the homeless, etc,” he said. Wong’s annual turnover is usually in the millions of pounds, much of which is absorbed by the cost of employing 70 to 80 staff members at A.Wong and its sister restaurant, Kym’s, in the City of London financial district. Source:...

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The Office’s John Krasinski launched a YouTube channel dedicated to good news
Apr06

The Office’s John Krasinski launched a YouTube channel dedicated to good news

John Krasinski, best known for playing Jim Halpert on NBC’s The Office, is back behind a desk and talking into a camera — this time, in a video on his new YouTube channel dedicated to sharing good news. The show is exactly what it sounds like: Krasinski will talk about a few heartwarming, good stories that people might be looking for right now while stuck at home during the COVID-19 pandemic. There are stories about the support cities around the world have shown health care workers from their own apartments, clapping and cheering out their windows. There are stories about a homeowner making a delivery driver’s day by leaving gifts on the porch. There are even stories about a man who purchased 100 lobsters in Maine to help a local fisherman. It’s an adorable video, made all the cuter by Krasinski’s sincerity. “I’m John Krasinski, and if it isn’t clear yet, I have absolutely no idea what I’m doing,” he says. But since this is John Krasinski, there are a few guest appearances that make it a little more than a regular vlog. Krasinski is joined halfway in by Steve Carell, who played opposite him in The Office. The show just celebrated its 15-year-anniversary, and the two spoke a little about being on the series together, the lasting success it’s had, and their favorite scenes. Then, toward the end of the video, Krasinski talks to a teenager who went viral over the weekend. Courtney “Coco” Johnson returned home from her last chemotherapy treatment last week and was surprised by a group of her friends welcoming her back — from a safe social distance. “I wrote to your mom and told her that I cried for a very long time after watching that, just pure joy,” Krasinski tells her. “You guys rock for sharing that with the rest of the world.” Krasinski isn’t the first celebrity to turn to YouTube during the pandemic, but he is one of the first to do so just for fun. Late-night comedians like Seth Meyers, Jimmy Fallon, Jimmy Kimmel, and Stephen Colbert have uploaded daily “mini” versions of their shows from home. Like the late-night hosts, Krasinski’s tech setup isn’t superb by any stretch of the imagination. The artwork is drawn by his daughters, there’s no microphone for Krasinski to speak into, and it kind of looks like he’s filming with a low-grade webcam. “I’M JOHN KRASINSKI, AND IF IT ISN’T CLEAR YET, I HAVE ABSOLUTELY NO IDEA WHAT I’M DOING.” That only adds to the appeal of the video. This isn’t a big production designed to garner millions of subscribers and land top...

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New York couple shout ‘I do’ as friend officiates wedding from his fourth-floor window
Apr06

New York couple shout ‘I do’ as friend officiates wedding from his fourth-floor window

In a time where fear is spreading rampantly thru the world, let us recognize another virus worth spreading- LOVE. “Reilly Jennings and Amanda Wheeler tied the knot on Friday at a ceremony held on a small street in the Manhattan neighborhood of Washington Heights. Matt Wilson, a friend and a licensed marriage officiant, leaned out of his fourth-floor window to lead the ceremony safely away from anyone who might be carrying coronavirus. “It was the most New York moment ever and was even more special to share with the entire neighborhood in such a scary and uncertain time,” Jennings told CNN. “I love this city.” -CNN Sources: CNN,...

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Doctor Left Crying After Officer Pulls Her Over For Speeding But Gives Her Face Masks Instead of a Ticket
Apr05

Doctor Left Crying After Officer Pulls Her Over For Speeding But Gives Her Face Masks Instead of a Ticket

When a Minnesota state trooper pulled over Dr. Sarosh Ashraf Janjua for driving above the speed limit in her car last week, she assumed she was going to be ticketed for the offense. Upon handing the policeman her Massachusetts driver’s license, Janjua explained how she flies out to Minnesota from Boston once a month in order to do cardiology work at the local hospitals. “He went back to his patrol car to look up my license, and when he returned, quite firmly told me it was very irresponsible of me to be speeding, especially since I would not only take up resources if I got into an accident, but would also not be in a position to help patients,” 37-year-old Janjua later “Feeling thoroughly chastised, I waited for him to write me a ticket. Instead, he told me he was going to let me off with a warning. As I sputtered to apologize and say thank you, he reached in to hand me what I assumed was my license back.” To her surprise, the officer handed her five new N95 masks from his own personal state-supplied stash. “I burst into tears. And though it may just have been the cold wind, I think he teared up a little as well, before wishing me well and walking away,” she continued. “Like all healthcare workers and emergency responders around the world, I have felt afraid of not having adequate protective equipment, and in my darkest moments, have worried about what would happen if I fell sick far from home. “This complete stranger, who owed me nothing and is more on the front lines than I am, shared his precious masks with me, without my even asking,” she added. “The veil of civilization may be thin, but … we are going to be ok.” The state trooper, who was later identified as Brian J. Schwartz, says that he was simply hoping to support a hardworking healthcare professional combatting the novel coronavirus outbreaks in Duluth. “Thank you to Sarosh for her hard work and dedication,” wrote the state trooper’s Facebook page. “Troopers are working hard during the pandemic and are thinking about all the first responders who are caring for Minnesotans during this critical time.” https://www.goodnewsnetwork.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/Dr-Sarosh-Ashraf-Janjua-Facebook.jpg https://www.goodnewsnetwork.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/Brian-Schwartz-Minnesota-State-Patrol-Released.jpg Source:...

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This Woman Did Yoga on the Highway While Stuck in 2-Hour Traffic Jam
Jun24

This Woman Did Yoga on the Highway While Stuck in 2-Hour Traffic Jam

Perspective can enslave you or it can free you. You may not always choose the scenarios that arise in your life, but you can always choose how you will react to them, and in that choice you create your happiness (or misery). In an effort to “clear the traffic in her mind”, this bored driver hopped out of her vehicle last Wednesday to do some good ol’ fashioned blacktop yoga. The woman, Kristin Bjornsen, had been sitting in a bumper to bumper Miami traffic jam for two hours before finally deciding to do something fun. The driver behind her snapped a photo of Kristin’s spur of the moment cobra pose, resulting in a hilarious example of roadside stress...

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Making sense: are we ready to ditch the disposable economy?
May07

Making sense: are we ready to ditch the disposable economy?

From a surge of interest in repair cafes, to a new wave of workspaces for freelance makers, we explore fresh signs that we’re demanding a new relationship with ‘stuff’ Can possessions ever be positive? asked our feature in 2016 titled True Riches. There are fresh signs that our relationship with consuming is undergoing an overhaul. On 1 January, a tax break bill came into force in Sweden that reduced by half the VAT on repairing items such as bicycles, clothes and shoes, as well as dishwashers and washing machines. The legislation will, it is hoped, encourage people to fix their possessions instead of buying new. In the UK, not only are we consuming less (Office for National Statistics data shows that we each used, on average, 10 tonnes of raw material in 2013 compared to 15 tonnes in 2001) but government figures released in December suggest that we’re also sending less to landfill. The community of makers at Building BloQs in north London includes ‘old dogs’ and young graduates, says co-founder Al Parra. Image: Jon Cardwell/AHEC Digital disruption has been credited at least in part for the change, as consumers buy fewer resource-intensive goods and source things digitally instead. But is it a cultural shift too? Transactions in the UK’s ‘sharing economy’ doubled to £7.4bn in 2015 according to a PricewaterhouseCoopers report, making it the fastest-growing market of its kind in Europe. Support Positive News From just £1 a month you can help fund good journalism about good things. Become a Positive News supporter member Sharing and making are more positive ways to satisfy the innate human need for novelty, believes Ruth Potts, co-author of a manifesto for ‘new materialism’. “Making makes us more adaptable, better able to respond to changing circumstances and better at solving problems.” Making makes us more adaptable, better able to respond to changing circumstances and better at solving problems And a team at the University of Dundee have discovered other benefits. While exploring prototyping, they found that those working in three dimensions created more imaginative solutions than those working on paper or screen. What is more, the process created stronger, healthier teams. This sense of comradery is thriving at the 1,022sq m Building BloQs workshop in Enfield, north London, a suburb that was previously best known for its high rate of knife crime. The social enterprise rents space and tools on a pay-as-you-go basis to freelance makers and designers in wood, metal, textiles, CNC and paint. Demand means it is due to expand within the year, when it will become the largest open access workshop in Europe. ‘People are placing greater value on things...

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